‘Serial’ Flu Shots May Limit Body’s Ability to Fight Virus in Future

Doctors maintain that flu shots are capable of saving one’s life, but apparently, people start to face a huge dilemma, whether to get jabbed or avoid those shots as they are useless and cause more harm than good. serial-flu-shots-may-limit-bodys-ability-fight-virus-future1-600x384 However, researchers have found that “serial vaccination” might, in fact, reduce the ability to fight the virus. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, an epidemiologist at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, revealed the following for the CTV News: “Nothing surprises me anymore with influenza. It’s such a changeable virus.” The flu season begins in late November, but its culmination is at the end of December. Yet, influenza cases have already been reported. However, recent research suggests that the more flu vaccines you receive, the less protected you are from the virus in the future. According to a study published by Skowronski, people who received these vaccines consecutively in 2012, 2013, and 2014 have an increased risk of being infected with new strains of the flu. He claims: “If we’re seeing some signals of declining vaccine protection, we want to respond to that — but we don’t want to overreact.” His study is one of the many which suggests the similar threat. According to the report of the Canadian flu surveillance network in the aftermath of 2009’s H1N1 flu epidemic, people who received the shot in late 2008 has a 1.4 and 2.5 times higher risk to contract an H1N1 infection that required medical attention, in comparison to those who didn’t get jabbed. Another recent report claims that during the 2014-2015 flu season, individuals who received the vaccines the previous year had more chances to benefit from flu shots than those who received them two years in a row. Skowronski convened a meeting in Vancouver in the middle of October to open a discussion about these issues, together with 40 scientists from around the world. Dr. Mark Loeb, a scientist at McMaster University who is investigating the issue claims that “The actual implications of current findings are unclear — but important enough to warrant investigation — to differentiate signal from noise.” This vaccine functions by producing antibodies that can repel only a particular strain of influenza. Therefore, these vaccines are annually altered in order to be able to fight the ever-changing virus better. It is a fact that there is a need for further research, but studies now suggest that annual flu shots might impede the ability of the immune system to fight off new strains of the virus that show up after immunization. Canadian, American, and European researchers are investigating the matter, and Quebec has already put its multi-million-dollar flu vaccination program under the microscope. Dr. Gaston De Serres of Quebec’s public health institute reported that “The Ministry wants to know what were the findings and how can we optimize the program for the province.” Meanwhile, doctors claim that flu shots really save lives, and they should be given to all people, especially to seniors, children under the age of two and people suffering from chronic medical conditions. Skowronski says “I think it would be premature and possibly even dangerous, frankly, for us to make strong statements in either direction or a radical policy change, on the basis of these findings. It would be hazardous for those individuals to stop getting the influenza vaccine on the basis of these early signals.” Yet, the annual flu shot campaigns remain the same until more evidence is provided in this direction, so public health officials cannot be certain about the existence of real or scientific red herrings. Source: www.ctvnews.ca

Share and Enjoy

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *